Ìṣí ojúewé ètò àkọ́kọ́
Ìgbà Ìbíniàtijọ́
65.5–23.03 ẹgbẹgbẹ̀rún ọdun sẹ́yìn
240px
Mean atmospheric O2 content over period duration ca. 26 Vol %[1]
(130 % of modern level)
Mean atmospheric CO2 content over period duration ca. 500 ppm[2]
(2 times pre-industrial level)
Mean surface temperature over period duration ca. 18 °C[3]
(4 °C above modern level)
Àdàkọ:Ìgbà Ìbíniàtijọ́ graphical timeline

The Paleogene (alternatively Palæogene, informally Lower Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that began 65.5 ± 0.3 and ended 23.03 ± 0.05 million years ago and comprises the first part of the Cenozoic Era.[4] Lasting 42 million years, the Paleogene is most notable as being the time in which mammals evolved from relatively small, simple forms into a large group of diverse animals in the wake of the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event that ended the preceding Cretaceous Period. Some of these mammals would evolve into large forms that would dominate the land, while others would become capable of living in marine, specialized terrestrial and even airborne environments. Birds also evolved considerably during this period, changing into roughly modern forms. Most other branches of life on earth remained relatively unchanged in comparison to birds and mammals during this period. Some continental motion took place. Climates cooled somewhat over the duration of the Paleogene and inland seas retreated from North America early in the period.



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